Honduras Joins Shark Coalition


Just one year after President Porfirio Lobo Sosa and Palau President Johnson Toribiong issued a global challenge to protect dwindling shark species, several countries, states, and territories have answered that call.Lobo signs

Leaders from eight countries have launched an initiative to prevent the extinction of sharks, pledging to develop a shark sanctuary more than three times the land mass of Mexico, with Honduras, the Bahamas, the Maldives, and Tokelau creating sanctuaries for sharks off their shores just this year.

Members of the coalition: Bahamas, Colombia, Honduras, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Micronesia, and Palau committed to a declaration supporting the development of sanctuaries that end commercial shark fishing in their national waters.

Sharks are especially vulnerable to overfishing because they mature and reproduce slowly. As top predators, their depletion also has risks for the health of entire ocean ecosystems.

Sharks are the intended catch of some fisheries. They are also frequently caught unintentionally as bycatch. In certain fishing operations, including open sea longliners that target tuna and swordfish, as much as 25 percent of the take can be shark bycatch.

“The shark sanctuary here supports the health of our ocean environment and economy,” said Honduran President Lobo Sosa. “However, these species migrate beyond our waters, so it is necessary for us to work together to ensure that their populations and marine ecosystems are healthy.”

 

Members of the coalition: Bahamas, Colombia, Honduras, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mexico, Micronesia, and Palau committed to a declaration supporting the development of sanctuaries that end commercial shark fishing in their national waters.

Sharks are especially vulnerable to overfishing because they mature and reproduce slowly. As top predators, their depletion also has risks for the health of entire ocean ecosystems.

Sharks are the intended catch of some fisheries. They are also frequently caught unintentionally as bycatch. In certain fishing operations, including open sea longliners that target tuna and swordfish, as much as 25 percent of the take can be shark bycatch.


“The shark sanctuary here supports the health of our ocean environment and economy,” said Honduran President Lobo Sosa. “However, these species migrate beyond our waters, so it is necessary for us to work together to ensure that their populations and marine ecosystems are healthy.”

 

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